X
Close

Engines

There are three types of internal combustion engines from an alternative fuel supply standpoint: mono-fuel, bi-fuel, and dual-fuel engines.

Mono-fuel Engines

Mono-fuel engines have the advantage of maximizing fuel cost savings, reducing maintenance costs and lowering harmful emissions. The drawbacks are limited range and dependency on refueling infrastructure and possible loss of performance.

Conventional ignition combustion mono-fuel engines use either gasoline or diesel. These internal combustion engines can be converted to an alternative mono-fuel such as Autogas, Natural Gas, Hydrogen, Ethanol, or Biogas; the first two being the most popular solution. These engines are Spark Ignited (SI).

Converting Gasoline to Autogas (LPG) or Natural Gas (NG): Conversion kits are simple and modifications are few and simple.

Converting Diesel to Natural Gas (NG): Conversion kits are elaborate and modifications are significant. The diesel fuel system is removed from the engine and, in particular, the diesel fuel injector is replaced by a spark plug connected to an ignition coil.


Dual Fuel and Bi-Fuel Engines

Bi-fuel engines have the advantage of balancing fuel cost savings, range, harmful emissions and flexibility. The drawbacks are maintenance costs and longer return on investments.

Conventional ignition combustion mono-fuel engines use either gasoline or diesel. These internal combustion engines can be modified to accept an alternative fuel such as Autogas, Natural Gas, mainly. These engines are qualified as bi-fuel or dual fuel. The gasoline engines are Spark Ignited while the diesel engines are Compression Ignited. These systems allow to run on either fuel or combination.

Converting Gasoline to Autogas (LPG) or Natural Gas (NG): Conversion kits are simple and modifications are few and simple.

Converting Diesel to Natural Gas (NG): when running on NG, the gas mixture is ignited by the compression of a small amount of diesel introduced in the combustion chamber by the standard diesel fuel system.

Dual Fuel engines have the advantage of reducing the cost of the system and still balancing fuel range and flexibility. The drawbacks are lower fuel savings and higher harmful emissions compared to bi-fuel systems.

Conventional ignition combustion mono-fuel engines use either gasoline or diesel. These internal combustion engines can be modified to accept an alternative fuel such as Autogas, Natural Gas, mainly. These engines are qualified as bi-fuel or dual fuel. The gasoline engines are Spark Ignited while the diesel engines are Compression Ignited. These systems allow to run on either fuel or combination.

Converting Gasoline with to Autogas (LPG) or Natural Gas (NG): Conversion kits are simple and modifications are few and simple.

Converting Diesel to Natural Gas (NG): when running on NG, the gas mixture is ignited by the compression of a small amount of diesel introduced in the combustion chamber by the standard diesel fuel system.